Taking care of your pet in the summer heat

Last week, C4C was involved in a heat stroke scare that really put the danger of these warm summer months into perspective. A friend called in and frantically asked what to do in this particular situation and they were fortunate that they acted quickly and everything turned out just fine for their dog. However, this indecent did make us aware how great of a threat the heat is to ourselves as well as our animals. Remember: our pets don’t have a voice, so keep a close eye on their behavior.

Please use caution when you’re out with your animals this summer. If you do notice a change in your pet’s behavior during or after time spent outside; don’t hesitate to give your vet a precautionary phone call.

LET’S KEEP OUR PETS SAFE THIS SUMMER!

C4C would like to pass along an article that we believe can be extremely beneficial in cases having to do with the prevention and treatment of heat related illness.

The content below is brought to you courtesy of:

Be a Cool Owner: Don’t Let Your Dog Overheat

Written By: PetPlace Veterinarians

Working up a good sweat in the hot summer months may be good for you, but it can lead to heat stroke in your dog and kill him in a matter of minutes. Heat stroke is a dangerous condition that takes the lives of many animals every year. Your dog’s normal body temperature is 100.5 to 102.5 degrees Fahrenheit. If it rises to 105 or 106 degrees, the dog is at risk for developing heat exhaustion. If the body temperature rises to 107 degrees, your dog has entered the dangerous zone of heat stroke. With heat stroke, irreversible damage and death can occur.

Here are some summer facts:

The temperature in a parked car can reach 160 degrees in a matter of minutes, even with partially opened windows. And any dog exercising on a hot, humid day, even with plenty of water, can become overheated. Overheating often leads to heat stroke. As a pet owner, you should know the dangers of overheating and what to do to prevent it.

You should also know the signs of heat stroke and what to do if your dog exhibits those signs.

When humans overheat we are able to sweat in order to cool down. However, your dog cannot sweat as easily; he must rely on panting to cool down. Dogs breathe in through the nose and out through the mouth, directing the air over the mucous membranes of the tongue, throat and trachea to facilitate cooling by evaporation of fluid. Your dog also dissipates heat by dilation of the blood vessels in the surface of the skin in the face, ears and feet. When these mechanisms are overwhelmed, hyperthermia and heat stroke usually develop.

Dogs who have a thick coat, heart and lung problems or a short muzzle are at greater risk for heat stroke. Others at risk include:

  • Puppies up to 6 months of age
  • Large dogs over 7 years of age and small dogs over 14 years
  • Overweight dogs
  • Dogs who are overexerted
  • Ill dogs or those on medication
  • Brachycephalic dogs (short, wide heads) like pugs, English bulldogs and Boston terriers
  • Dogs with cardiovascular disease and/or poor circulation

What To Watch For:

If your dog is overheating, he will appear sluggish and unresponsive. He may appear disorientated. The gums, tongue and conjunctiva of the eyes may be bright red and he will probably be panting hard. He may even start vomiting. Eventually he will collapse, seizure and may go into a coma.

If your dog exhibits any of these signs, treat it as an emergency and call your veterinarian immediately. On the way to your veterinary hospital, you can cool your pet with wet towels, spray with cool water from a hose or by providing ice chips for your dog to chew (providing he is conscious).

Veterinary Care:

Heat related illness is typically diagnosed based on physical exam findings and a recent history that could result in overheating. Your veterinarian may perform various blood tests to assess the extent of vital organ dysfunction caused by overheating.

Intensity of treatment depends upon the cause and severity of the heat illness

Mildly increased temperature (less than 105°F) may only require rest, a fan to increase air circulation, fresh water to drink and careful observation.

Markedly increased temperature (greater than 106°F) must be treated more aggressively. Cooling can be promoted externally by immersion in cool water or internally by administering a cool water enema.

Underlying aggravating conditions, such as upper airway obstructive diseases, heart disease, lung disease and dehydration may be treated with appropriate medications, supplemental oxygen or fluid therapy.

Home Care:

Heat stroke is a life-threatening emergency. Check your dog’s temperature rectally if you suspect heat stroke. If it is over 105 degrees F, remove your dog from the heat source immediately and call your veterinarian.

Meanwhile, place a cool, wet towel over your dog or place him in a cool bath. Do not use ice because it may cause skin injury. Spraying with water from a garden hose also works well.

Written by Karen Ragusa

Karen has gracefully run this organization and watched it grow since 2008. She’s seen it all over the years and loves to write about her adventures!

Comments

2 Comments on "Taking care of your pet in the summer heat"

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